Friday, October 17, 2008

Frodo's Story, Part I: Life Before Deity

He is one of the world’s greatest heroes. His deeds form the foundation of his reputation as a person who does great deeds. He has inspired millions, and some say it was He who started the whole capitalization of pronouns thing when referring to supreme beings. Others say it was Jesus. Still others say it was a typo. And a few maintain Jesus was a typo and the correct spelling is ‘Jebus’. Regardless, the story of Frodo’s life before He became a deity is often misunderstood. Hear it now for the first time from his own lips – well, read it, I suppose, would be more accurate – as an F! exclusive.

It might help if you imagine you’re listening to Barbara Walters.

Growing pains

From an early age Frodo believed He was adopted. He was at least aware that he didn’t take after His father, and attempts to connect with him felt false. His ‘father’ was a carpenter, or a shoemaker, perhaps a barber, or some damn thing, and was later driven to suicide when Frodo did not love him in return. From the age of two, it was already clear Frodo would make a big impact on many people’s lives.

His relationship with His mother was not much better. He always suspected she was not a virgin, as she claimed. “Whenever I brought it up she started to panic. She made excuses, and started cleaning our hobbit hole obsessively." It was only when He realized that He was God incarnate that his childhood began to make sense. “I always felt Gandalf was trying to push the virgin thing too hard, like they all had something to hide. He said it was important for the integrity of the Faith." When asked whether this betrayal by His mother could be responsible for the diminished status of women in Frodology, He calmly responded “No. It’s because they’re evil."

Before becoming the Ring Bearer, Frodo was by His own admission a lay about. “I sort of just hung about the Shire, criticizing people for their flaws. I didn’t even try to get a real job. I’d say Bilbo tolerated me, at most. Of course, when I became God, he couldn’t be prouder, but he just wanted a piece. Everybody did." But even when Frodo was initially given the task of destroying the Ring, He was reluctant. “The Biannual Star Trek Convention was coming to town. I had my Spock costume ready. It would’ve been great. Also, Taco Bell had just launched a new spicy super burrito – full, human sized, not the tiny hobbit things they usually sell in the Shire."


"Bilbo gave foster parents a bad name"


From hobbit to hero

When asked about the quest itself, Frodo grows silent and introspective. Finally, He speaks. “Tolkien, he was a great writer, but he glossed over a lot. Peter Jackson too. Glorified some pretty messed up stuff. If they do it again, my choice would be Oliver Stone. Have you seen Platoon? Incredible." One senses that Frodo is avoiding the subject. Finally, He settles down to talk. “Initially, there was a lot of tension in the ranks. It was racism, plain and simple. The dwarf called us ‘whiny little children’. Have you seen him? Body of a dwarf, heart of a midget."

Frodo had troubled relations with Aragorn too, long considered the mission’s key leader. “He came to me one night after the campfire had died down, and told me a story about how ancient Spartan warriors were all pederasts, and how they were better fighters for it. There was definitely a loss of trust at that point." Aragorn also gave Frodo a rare edition of the Marquis de Sade’s Complete Works. “Why do I still have it? Sentimentality I guess. I’ve never read it."

Frodo is touchy when it comes to the subject of the destruction of the Ring itself. “A lot of people have said that I wanted the Ring for myself at that point, or at least that I would have given in to its powers if it hadn’t been for Samwise chucking it into the volcano." He pauses, thinking. “I’d say Sam jumped the gun a bit, I definitely would. I’m not saying he wanted it for himself, or even wanted the credit. All I know is I woke up from my coma at Elrond’s place a few days later, and Sam had already told his story. And that’s how everyone assumed it went down."

After seeing Jackson’s trilogy based on Frodo’s incredible story, much of the audience was convinced that something had happened between Frodo and his faithful manservant during the trip. “Happened? Yeah, something definitely happened. We made plans to launch a small business together, but when we got back home, we found out the funding had fallen through. Our investor told us he couldn’t see a Ben & Jerry’s franchise being profitable. But he was from Rohan, so what does he know? I hear their women mate with horses."

From hero to the Almighty

So it was a twist of fate that led Frodo away from entrepreneurship and down the path of deification. But settling back into life at home after destroying the Ring of Power wasn’t easy on Frodo. “It was then that people started to worship me. It was a little uncomfortable at first, but I began to see its uses." Often forgotten is the fact that at that point, many saw his co-adventurer Samwise as deserving of worship too. What caused Sam's fall from grace? "People saw the film and assume he got married and everything was peachy. All soft focus filters and golden hues. But he couldn't handle being a husband and a god at the same time. He was all wrapped up in his image. Then the wife starting giving him stick for neglecting the family. On top of that I think he was jealous of me. And then there were the drugs."

At that point Frodo still considered himself more of a demigod than a full on deity. “There was a lot of pressure for me to die young though. I think people wanted to idealize my memory. There was talk of crosses and unsealed tombs. It’s not for everyone though."

In the end though, Frodo did become a God. Unfortunately, we’re out of time for today, so tune in next time on F! for the next chapter in Frodo’s incredible story.

1 comment:

Vitamin R said...

And a few maintain Jesus was a typo and the correct spelling is ‘Jebus’.

Actually, it's spelled Jeebus, as in "Jee, willickers! It's Jeebus!"

It might help if you imagine you’re listening to Barbara Walters.

Nah, she frightens me. But I like Stone Phillips.

When asked whether this betrayal by His mother could be responsible for the diminished status of women in Frodology, He calmly responded “No. It’s because they’re evil."

LMAO!

I mean--hey! Look at the way Shirefolk drink! You try finding a virginal Hobbit above the age of 33!

Frodo had troubled relations with Aragorn too, long considered the mission’s key leader. “He came to me one night after the campfire had died down, and told me a story about how ancient Spartan warriors were all pederasts, and how they were better fighters for it. There was definitely a loss of trust at that point." Aragorn also gave Frodo a rare edition of the Marquis de Sade’s Complete Works. “Why do I still have it? Sentimentality I guess. I’ve never read it."

So very many things wrong with that paragraph. I can't even list them all. Mostly because I'm laughing to hard.

Although I figure Aragorn for a masochistic sub. Not that I've given it any real thought. . . .

Often forgotten is the fact that at that point, many saw his co-adventurer Samwise as deserving of worship too. What caused Sam's fall from grace? "People saw the film and assume he got married and everything was peachy. All soft focus filters and golden hues. But he couldn't handle being a husband and a god at the same time. He was all wrapped up in his image. Then the wife starting giving him stick for neglecting the family. On top of that I think he was jealous of me. And then there were the drugs."

Crimesin! At least to staunch Samologists.